More from Karalyn @ Food Plant Solutions: Think Global, Act Local

Interview by Anna White

Trainees at the community training about uses for local plants and foods in Vietnam.

Recently I chatted with Karalyn Hingston. Karalyn is the Executive Officer and only paid employee of Food Plant Solutions – a small organisation which is achieving great things on a shoestring budget both at an international level and in Australia. I found it inspiring to learn of a small Australian organisation achieving positive outcomes and punching well above its weight. Cooking Circles chatted with her last year and here she gives an update on the organisations’ international development projects.

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Create bush tucker meals this Reconciliation Week

Book your Bush Tucker Cooking Circle Lunch now

Join Cooking Circles learn which native Bush Tucker plants you can grow and cook with. Learn how to harvest from native plants for using in savoury and sweet dishes, in drinks and baking. Taste testing and detailed notes included. We will then cook with some of the many ingredients and enjoy a native Bush Tucker lunch together

Narelle Happ is a garden designer and horticulturist who specialises in native garden and permaculture design.

She has over a decade of experience and is passionate about creating ‘living’ spaces which are nurturing, productive and sustainable.

Garden styles range from natural bushland, rainforest, cottage or formal. Permaculture designs include garden layouts for food production and sustainability. Designs that extend to engage and educate communities and schools by creating kitchen gardens and living classrooms.

Finding Food Plant Solutions: Interview with Karalyn

To say I was excited when I first heard about Food Plant Solutions is quite the understatement. Through Canberra Friends of Dili of which I’m a casual member, I was contacted by a fellow member who suggested I speak to Karalyn of Food Plant Solutions in Tasmania. There were synergies, she explained, with my interests in Timor Leste and its vast edible plant diversity. And it didn’t take me long on this mob’s fascinating website before I was contacting Karalyn to talk more.

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Food Security in Timor Leste

by Sarah Burr

What is food security? To be food secure is to always have access to sufficient, nutritious, and affordable food. Food security covers the dimensions of time, place, quantity, quality, and cost. To be food insecure is to be lacking at least one of these components. Food insecurity can lead to malnutrition, stunted growth in children, and ill-health. In Timor Leste, two-thirds of the population are food insecure.

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Women in agriculture in Timor Leste

by Sarah Burr

Women are incredibly important to agriculture all over the world. In Timor Leste, women in mountainous areas (where 70 per cent of the Timorese population lives) carry out most farm activities including taking care of animals and cultivation of rain-fed crops such as sweet potato, cassava and fruit. Timorese women increasingly took on farm work during conflict as men left towns and villages to fight. Post-conflict, women have continued this work due to men returning from war suffering physical and mental injury. This farm workload is on top of women’s other duties such as child-rearing, housework, caring for elders, and community responsibilities.

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Recipe: Tukkir

IMG_2977How I love this dish. I’ve blogged about it during my trip. I wrote about it countless times over Facebook to Berta in between visits. I ached for the dish every day in Timor Leste, hoping one day, soon, there would be the kind of celebration that called for Tukkir to be prepared.

I’ve said before that making Tukkir is about as wonderful as eating it. For me that’s because the entire family gathers to prepare the dish, kicking back while they work methodically and slowly, telling tales and joking throughout. People appear relaxed. At their finest. Day turns into night, and the fire is lit as the sun drops out of sight. After 2 hours on the fire, the edible part of Tukkir is removed carefully from bamboo. There’s anxious silence as the Tukkir is revealed. Sudden laughter cracks in the air and seats are taken anywhere they can be to tuck into the wonderful, the very special, Tukkir.

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